Tuesday, January 08, 2008

Visualizing Targets

7 comments:

more_JazZz said...

Himawan, hi

What mean San Jose California? ^)

Himawan Nugroho said...

Hi, please use your imagination ;)

yognix said...

Hi, Himawan

California is my big dream too ;)
Tcl/tk - ok, it's for Cisco tclsh, but Juniper certification?

Himawan Nugroho said...

Hi, I have my own reasons for target in picture no.2 from left. One of them is: if you work in any company that provides services to SP customers, eventually you have to deal with those two top networking vendors, regardless which side you are in. And you won't be able to keep saying 'integration is not in scope of work' every time.

yognix said...

Hi, from that point of view, it's ok. If customers believe only in three-or-four letter acronyms. I was afraid that passing Juniper certification is only the way to get to San Jose for you. ;) As for me, now I'm preparing to pass CCIE Security Lab. And it's only one certification (CCIE) which worth to pass. IMHO. I can pass MCSE Security, CISSP, and lot of others. But I'm not sure that it's a good idea. I saw how certified CCIE R&S was unable even to configure interface on FreeBSD. I saw how stupid CISSP was unable to understand that it's possible to create rootkit and covert channel in such a way that he can't detect it. I saw how uncertified man can do anything just after short introduction. I saw lot of examples. And I'm sure that passing certifications is useful only for self-confidence and only when you know what are you doing. I'm sure that you know. Your blog is very helpful and not only because of CCIE hints. Thanks.

yognix said...

Hi, Himawan

I found useful citation:
"To achieve CCIE certification is to ascend the pinnacle of technical excellence in the IT profession. While CCIEs inevitably gain extensive product knowledge on their way to certification, product training is not the program objective. Rather, the focus is on identifying those experts capable of understanding and navigating the intricacies and potential pitfalls
inherent in end-to-end networking, regardless of technology or product brand."
(from foreword to Cisco Press "CCIE Practical Studies, Volume 1")

I'm sure that you are already an "expert capable of understanding and navigating the intricacies and potential pitfalls
inherent in end-to-end networking, regardless of technology or product brand." You don't need Juniper. ;)

FourthDan said...

Which bike is that? :)
And I think you need to add CCDE to this list too :D

- Mithun